A NEW BEGINNING

 






Urban wetlands meet
CSE initiates a core committee

  

IN FOCUS

Null and void?
A success story?
The flouride menace
 

CAMPAIGN

Lake in news
From the courtroom
To save this tal
Operation Baikal

INITIATIVE

Stories from Dewas
Meerut meet
Initiating change
Sensitising regional media
Doosra dasak
Glimmer of hope
History rewritten
HLL harvests
Water soliders
The kiwi connection
Exploring Ahmednagar

FACE TO FACE

For my home....

TECHNOLOGY

Bamboo-supari pits
Countering flouride
Techno tit bits

CSE'S LATEST DESIGNS

Meet the new harvesters!

JAL YODHA

T R Sureshchandra
Arun Mathur
Shivanajayya
K G Vyas

R Ramani

NEWS FROM CHENNAI

Recharge maps
Bank loans for RWH
Harvesting in Nilgris
The Vengaivasal model

'Water wisdom' in schools

JAL BIRADARI

No to bore wells
Ghagara revived
Jal bhai, Jal bahen

NEWS FROM GUJARAT

Charting future
City's pride

CLASSROOM

FUNDING AGENCY

WATER  WISDOM

NEWS FROM ABROAD

WATER IN NEWS

READERS SPACE

AN OPPORTUNITY

BOOK/DOCUMENTS

VISUAL WATCH

WEB INFO

EVENT


   
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Vol. 4   

No. 5

October-November 2002

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European grants

12-3.jpg (2154 bytes)As substantial part the European Commission's (EC)annual assistance - Euro 100 million is channelled to large bilateral projects. However, the scheme 'EC funds open to NGOs' allows for about 100 small scale projects to be undertaken by NGOs.

The programmes on education, health and, rural and natural resource development are funded. Under the latter category grants for land reclamation, forestry, watershed management and, irrigation projects are available. Doon valley project and UP ravine stabilisation are one of the well known works funded by EC.

As funds are released under the co-financing scheme, Indian NGOs are expected to collaborate with a European NGO, who could fund 15 per cent of the total project cost. EC provides 50 percent of the cost that does not exceed more than Rs four crores. Rest is raised by the Indian NGO. For the guideline visit: www.europa.eu.int/ comm or contact: Delegation of the EC, 65, Golf Links, New Delhi 110 003; Tel: 462 9238




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The quest continues

With the beginning of the 19th century, researchers proved that contrary to the popular beliefs, the taste of the water alone can not determine its purity. New concerns and ways to tackle them are coming up. Continuing with the series, let us look at the initiatives from the 19th and 20th century.

dot.gif (88 bytes) In 1806, a large water treatment plant began operating in Paris. Sand and charcoal was renewed every six hours to filter the water, which was supplied by pumps driven by horses.

dot.gif (88 bytes) While studying the reasons behind the 1849 cholera epidemic in London, Dr John Snow unearthed the co-relations between water quality and health. Since then, the drinking water standards came into being.

dot.gif (88 bytes) The first governmental water regulation came in 1852. London enacted the Metropolitan Water Act, requiring the filtration of all water supplied.

dot.gif (88 bytes) In the latter part of the 19th century significant improvements in water treatment systems were introduced like, improved slow sand filters and application of chlorination and ozone for disinfection.

dot.gif (88 bytes) Belgium in 1902 and London in 1905 start chlorinating the drinking water. The public water supply from Boonton reservoir, New Jersey, was chlorinated. This inexpensive method producing water that is 20 times purer than filtered water was contested in the court and was upheld as city's right to public health.

dot.gif (88 bytes) In 1914, the country's first drinking water bacteriological standards (a maximum level of two coliforms per 100 ml) were specified by the US Department of the Treasury.

By the beginning of the 20th century, waterborne epidemics were eliminated from US. However, on the other side of the globe the situation remains grim even today. In the next issue, we will conclude this journey.


Copyright 2002 Centre for Science and Environment
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