A NEW BEGINNING

 






Urban wetlands meet
CSE initiates a core committee

  

IN FOCUS

Null and void?
A success story?
The flouride menace
 

CAMPAIGN

Lake in news
From the courtroom
To save this tal
Operation Baikal

INITIATIVE

Stories from Dewas
Meerut meet
Initiating change
Sensitising regional media
Doosra dasak
Glimmer of hope
History rewritten
HLL harvests
Water soliders
The kiwi connection
Exploring Ahmednagar

FACE TO FACE

For my home....

TECHNOLOGY

Bamboo-supari pits
Countering flouride
Techno tit bits

CSE'S LATEST DESIGNS

Meet the new harvesters!

JAL YODHA

T R Sureshchandra
Arun Mathur
Shivanajayya
K G Vyas

R Ramani

NEWS FROM CHENNAI

Recharge maps
Bank loans for RWH
Harvesting in Nilgris
The Vengaivasal model

'Water wisdom' in schools

JAL BIRADARI

No to bore wells
Ghagara revived
Jal bhai, Jal bahen

NEWS FROM GUJARAT

Charting future
City's pride

CLASSROOM

FUNDING AGENCY

WATER  WISDOM

NEWS FROM ABROAD

WATER IN NEWS

READERS SPACE

AN OPPORTUNITY

BOOK/DOCUMENTS

VISUAL WATCH

WEB INFO

EVENT


   
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Vol. 4   

No. 5

October-November 2002

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Bamboo-supari pits

By using abundantly available local materials like bamboo and arecanut (supari) husk, farmers of Onikeri village, Dakshin Kannada, Karnataka, has developed a simple, low cost method to replenish the water tables. A one metre long bamboo stem is cut longitudinally and all septas are removed. Both the halves when kept together look like a pipe, which is inserted in the infiltration pit of two feet by two feet measurement. The cavity of the pit is filled with one layer of areca husk topped with a layer of soil. Only the husk needs to be refilled every year. Significantly, these structures have been installed in 34 houses with community participation, covering an area of 100 acres. Sound ecological engineering, indeed! (Information by Shree Padre, a journalist)


Countering flouride

"By combining rainwater harvesting (RWH) with the application of soluble calcium, the level of flouride in soil and water can be controlled," says S K Mishra, Public Health and Engineering Department, Jaipur. (For details: skmisra5@rediffmail.com) RWH reduces the flouride concentration by 40 per cent, but within six months it regains the original level.

The method is still being tested in Jaipur. Initial results are positive but final results are yet to come.


 

 

 

 


Techno tit bits

Sewage to light up your house!
A process has been evolved that transforms wet waste from sewage farms and paper mills into a source of power - for homes, factories and cars.

Headed by Ashok Bhattacharya, the process technology group at University of Warwick, UK, extracts pure hydrogen from abundantly available wet bio-matter, using the water contents of the material. (For details: Ashok.Bhattacharya@warwick.ac.uk) The group has now received four million euro from Dutch, German and UK firms to test their lab-based technique in larger prototypes for commercial installation.



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