A NEW BEGINNING

 






Urban wetlands meet
CSE initiates a core committee

  

IN FOCUS

Null and void?
A success story?
The flouride menace
 

CAMPAIGN

Lake in news
From the courtroom
To save this tal
Operation Baikal

INITIATIVE

Stories from Dewas
Meerut meet
Initiating change
Sensitising regional media
Doosra dasak
Glimmer of hope
History rewritten
HLL harvests
Water soliders
The kiwi connection
Exploring Ahmednagar

FACE TO FACE

For my home....

TECHNOLOGY

Bamboo-supari pits
Countering flouride
Techno tit bits

CSE'S LATEST DESIGNS

Meet the new harvesters!

JAL YODHA

T R Sureshchandra
Arun Mathur
Shivanajayya
K G Vyas

R Ramani

NEWS FROM CHENNAI

Recharge maps
Bank loans for RWH
Harvesting in Nilgris
The Vengaivasal model

'Water wisdom' in schools

JAL BIRADARI

No to bore wells
Ghagara revived
Jal bhai, Jal bahen

NEWS FROM GUJARAT

Charting future
City's pride

CLASSROOM

FUNDING AGENCY

WATER  WISDOM

NEWS FROM ABROAD

WATER IN NEWS

READERS SPACE

AN OPPORTUNITY

BOOK/DOCUMENTS

VISUAL WATCH

WEB INFO

EVENT


   
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Vol. 4   

No. 5

October-November 2002

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Recharge maps

The Tamilnadu Water Supply and Drainage Board and Anna University has prepared recharge maps for 365 blocks of the state. With these maps the demand, availability and potential of recharging water could be easily calculated. These maps empowers the administration to reinforce the water supply by-laws - making rainwater harvesting mandatory.

 


 

 


Bank loans for RWH

The Kancipuram co-operative bank, Tamil Nadu, is offering loans for rainwater harvesting (RWH). Introduced for the first time in India, Rs 2,000 to Rs 5,000 for individual houses and, Rs 50,000 for multistory complexes are given at 14 per cent interest. The repayment period varies from one to three years. The eligibility criteria requires the ownership of a house with a open well or borewell. Inaugurated on November 15, this scheme is a positive step.


Harvesting in Nilgris

To check the persisting water problem, Supriya Sahu, collector, Nilgiri district, Tamil Nadu, has developed a three pronged strategy. Its purpose is to popularise and implement rainwater harvesting (RWH) in the region. It focuses on:

  • Awareness generation among the local community,
  • Dissemination of information (In Tamilnadu Water Supply and Drainage Board's office an information desk has been opened),
  • Convergence of various schemes to be implemented by the district administration for pooling in resources to adopt rwh extensively.

While addressing a seminar on rwh organised by the state's Rotary Club, Sahu said, "To begin with RWH is being installed in the collector's office and then 806 systems will be introduced in 200 state offices in the district. In each of the six blocks in Nilgris, one model village will be developed to popularise the concept in rural areas." A task force has been formed to ensure implementation. A technical manual on RWH for hilly areas has also been prepared.


The Vengaivasal model

The farmers of a small village, Vengaivasal, about 15 km from Chennai, Tamil Nadu, have taken up the responsibility of conserving tanks and lakes. These farmers are the ayacut (command) users.

Periyeri and Sitteri, the two local lakes, have a spread of about 135 acres, an ayacut of about 150 hectares is collectively shared by 150 paddy cultivators. They have formed a registered association. The annual subscription collected from the members is used for the maintenance of these tanks. The Public Works Department (PWD) is already working on the plan of improving 58 tanks in the Cheenai region, as a part of the World Bank's Water Resources Consolidation Project. For effective execution of the works, several confidence building measures like, allowing the sale of earth that is removed during desiltation, have been taken by the administration.

Source: Ramachandran 2002, Vengaivasal, a model for conserving water resources, The Hindu


'Water wisdom' in schools

Two schools in Chennai have taken unique initiatives in water conservation. The E S Memorial Matriculation School in Sholinganallur, is reusing the recycled wastewater. And, Lady Willingdon Higher Secondary School, Royapetah, is catching  rain for groundwater recharge.

E S Memorial Matriculation School
"As the school is located beyond the Chennai Corporation limits, we had to do something with the 30 cubic metre of wastewater that is daily generated. The treatment plant designed by the Centre for Environmental Studies, Anna University, is a boon to us,"noted the principal Sakunthala Sharma.

Wastewater from kitchen, bathroom and toilets undergoes the root zone treatment (RZT) and is then re-used for irrigating school's farm, where vegetables and paddy is grown (within their compound).

In RZT, the wastewater before reaching the reed bed is passed through a series of settling chambers, containing coarse sand, gravel and blue metal to remove the suspended matters. The reed bed in the school is 1,000 sq m, which essentially consists of a specially prepared soil bed with an impermeable base. These reeds have thick roots called rhizomes that make the sand bed congenial for micro-organisms to grow and cleanse the water for reuse. In this manner 90 per cent of the wastewater is recovered.

"Although the total implementation cost amounted to Rs 15 lakhs, the maintenance cost is negligble," informs Sharma. The school now easily meets its daily water needs.

Lady Willingdon Higher Sec School
The school is located near Marina Beach, with a total student strength of about 2,500. The Chennai Metrowater Board has developed this school as a model project. The water works in Lady Willingdon were completed in October 2001.

During the implementation phase, students were actively invloved at all the levels, giving them a good understanding of the rainwater harvesting technique. The senior students also helped in digging trenches for the rainwater to flow. There are 13 percolation pits in the campus that are supervised by students.

"Earlier rainwater used to stagnate on the school grounds. Now it percolates and the grounds are not slushy. This technique will improve the groundwater quality, while restricting seawater intrusion," says the school's National Social Service coordinator, Samadhanam.

 


Copyright 2002 Centre for Science and Environment
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