A NEW BEGINNING

 






Urban wetlands meet
CSE initiates a core committee

  

IN FOCUS

Null and void?
A success story?
The flouride menace
 

CAMPAIGN

Lake in news
From the courtroom
To save this tal
Operation Baikal

INITIATIVE

Stories from Dewas
Meerut meet
Initiating change
Sensitising regional media
Doosra dasak
Glimmer of hope
History rewritten
HLL harvests
Water soliders
The kiwi connection
Exploring Ahmednagar

FACE TO FACE

For my home....

TECHNOLOGY

Bamboo-supari pits
Countering flouride
Techno tit bits

CSE'S LATEST DESIGNS

Meet the new harvesters!

JAL YODHA

T R Sureshchandra
Arun Mathur
Shivanajayya
K G Vyas

R Ramani

NEWS FROM CHENNAI

Recharge maps
Bank loans for RWH
Harvesting in Nilgris
The Vengaivasal model

'Water wisdom' in schools

JAL BIRADARI

No to bore wells
Ghagara revived
Jal bhai, Jal bahen

NEWS FROM GUJARAT

Charting future
City's pride

CLASSROOM

FUNDING AGENCY

WATER  WISDOM

NEWS FROM ABROAD

WATER IN NEWS

READERS SPACE

AN OPPORTUNITY

BOOK/DOCUMENTS

VISUAL WATCH

WEB INFO

EVENT


   
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Vol. 4   

No. 5

October-November 2002

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History rewritten

First the impact: within five years the water table has gone up by 20 feet. Between 1996 - 2002, the land under assured irrigation has increased from 13 to 243 hectares (ha) of the total 4,998 ha. Per capita income of most of the 249 households has registered an increase. This is the result of the water and soil conservation works taken up by the Gond tribals, living in village Rajkheta, Chattisgarh.

Since medieval times, this village has only witnessed poverty and drought, despite being ecologically rich. The region receives 1,600 milli meters (mm) of annual rainfall and is endowed with fertile soil and thick forests. Under the guidance of a local non-governmental organisation Surguja Gramin Vikas Sansthan (SGVS), villagers took the initiative to improve their lot."When the work started in 1995, the region was going through a dry spell and the villagers initial interest in this project was to work as labourers.However, after tasting the initial success, they became serious,"shared PNSingh, head of SGVS. They contributed Rs six lakhs of the total project cost of Rs 31 lakhs by way of labour.

"Now we even have excess food to sell," said Ramnath Gond, a villager.Today, as many parts of the state are under water stress, Rajkheta has enough water to grow paddy - an unimaginable feat, some five years ago.

Source: Sharma 2002, Where every drop of rain counts, Newstime

 

HLL harvests

One of the largest soap producing units of Hindustan Lever Limited (HLL) in Khamgaon block, Buldhana district, Maharashtra, has gradually reduced its dependence on groundwater by harnessing rainwater.

In 1993, HLL decided to reclaim five hectares of wasteland inside the factory using soil and water conservation technique as developed by Anna Hazare in Ralegaon Siddhi. The run-off is restricted by constructing a series of earthen bunds. The soil quality has improved and around 8,000 cubic meters of rainwater is collected every year. Different varieties of trees has been planted with the help of Bhartiya Agro Industries Foundation (BAIF) - transforming wasteland into green belt. More than 8,000 trees of timber, fruit, ornamental and other species has been planted. Wastewater management has also been integrated into the project. The kitchen and production waste is composted and used as manure. The effluent is treated and re-used for irrigation.

Its accomplishments has been awarded by the Vidarbha Industrial Safety Committee and the Inspectorate of Factories. HLL is now extending this project to its other factories.

The Kiwi connection

The civil society of New Zealand is involved in not only extending relief services but also funding community development projects in India. World Vision (WV), an international christian humanitarian aid and development organisation, has provided them the opportunity to get involved. Currently it is supporting more than 70 projects in 18 countries. Their programmes are unique.

Water soldiers

The government of Andhra Pradesh (AP) has initiated a unique project -'water soldiers' to facilitate effective implementation of the land and tree act, 2002. About 600 ex-servicemen are being trained on rainwater harvesting (RWH) techniques by the Hyderabad Metropolitan Water Supply and Sewerage Board to sensitise people in the twin cities to begin with. Later, it will be extended to the entire state. "Ex-servicemen are widely respected in society and their feedback on RWH would have a salutary effect on the residents, facilitating implementation," hopes Chandrababu Naidu, the chief minister of AP.

The 40 hours famine
By going without something dear like, food, computers, telephones or talking for 40 hours, the people raise money for overseas donation. Even eight to ten year old kids join in. In march, it was organised to help the village communities in Dahod, Gujarat, to fight drought.

Most common form of famine is going without food. Kiwis can consume Campanella's barley sugar and Just Juice's natural juices. Both these companies donate 75 per cent of the total amount collected. Started in 1975, it has become an annual event for around one lakh people, currently raising more than Aus $ 2.5 million. (www.famine.org.nz)

5.jpg (6872 bytes)Area development programme (ADP)
The objective of this programme is to make the village communities self reliant, by prioritising their needs. Since 1995, one of the five project that is active in Banswara, Rajasthan,  has primarily concentrated on water conservation works. The results are worth noting.

In one of the project villages', Garadiya, with WV's financial assistance, villagers built a checkdam. Positive results, encouraged them to plan for another one, which was opposed by the women. Increased drinking among men due to greater disposable   income from bumper crops was women's concern, which was acknowledged and ultimately resolved. "By speaking up, these women, who earlier were not even allowed to talk in the village meetings - has ensured a better life," says an ADP staff, while sharing the benefits. Commendable, indeed!

 


Copyright 2002 Centre for Science and Environment
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