A NEW BEGINNING

 






Forging ties

 

WATER LITERACY

Informing people
Water play
The facilitator
Water Gala

IN FOCUS
Faulty perceptions
Thirst rises, patience evaporates

URBAN WETLANDS

Eviction ordered
Join the BIG fight
Citizens pick up cudgels
Solar lakes

WATER MANAGEMENT
South India: Searching for an identity
Thailand: Then came progress....

INITIATIVE

An eye opener
Naudihi’s revival
Tankas of Badi Ghodan
Dialogue

CSE'S LATEST DESIGNS

Sri Aurobindo Ashram’s system

TECHNOLOGY

Rice husk ash filter
Clay pot irrigation

JAL YODHAS

Sachidanand Bharti
Madhu Bhatnagar

TRADITION

Naullahs of Kumaon

WATER IN NEWS

Kerala, building up its jalanidhi
Schemes or scams?

GREEN WATER HARVESTER'S NEWS

Saving lives
Rain associations
Review

CLASSROOM

Drop by drop
Water scramble

FUNDING AGENCY

Oxfam and water

BASIC FACT

3RD WATER FORUM

100 promises, deadline 2006
The landmarks
Changing currents

BOOK/DOCUMENTS

READERS SPACE

WEB INFO

EVENT


   
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Catch Water

Vol. 5 

No. 2

April-May 2003

 

Drop by drop

Myth
We have less water today than we did 50 years ago.

Reality
The amount of water remains the same on earth today, as it was when the planet was formed about three billion years ago. However, now its demand is growing at an alarming and unchecked rate.

Myth
Once we use water, its gone.

Reality
After water is used, it is recycled a number of times. Sometimes it can be reused within a day, a week; or may not be used again for years. Water is resilient and responds well to treatments. However, using water and abusing it are two different things.

There are many ways to save water. Most of these are either free or inexpensive. Even if it comes with a price tag, it is just an initial investment, which will be recovered with utility gains within a few years.

Saving indoors

  • Never pour water down the drain when there might be another use;
  • Shorten your shower by one minute;
  • Make your home leak free;
  • Don’t let water run, aimlessly;
  • Insulate water pipes to avoid wasting water while it heats up;

Irrigating wise

  • Mulch to retain soil moisture;
  • Adopt low cost irrigation methods like drip, sprinkler etc;
  • Build a small circular soil wall around young plants to hold water;
  • Do not fertilise in dry conditions;
  • Water plants in the mornings;
  • Switch to low intensive crops.

Just do your bit.
Save water, drop by drop.

Water Scramble

Can you place the letters in the right order and complete a water scramble?

  • Less than one per cent of all water on earth is _________ (ehsfr) water. _______ (nria) is the source of all water.

  • India receives most of its annual rainfall in just ______ (010) hours.

  • Wash bikes and cars with a ________ (utebck) and a sponge.
  • _________ (thacc) water, where it falls.


Funding

Oxfam and water

Providing clean safe drinking water, and improving sanitation, are key elements of Oxfam’s long term development work. A fact strongly emphasised in its ‘Strategic Plan, 2002 - 2008’ as well.

Oxfam has been working in India since 1951. It began by responding to a severe famine in Bihar. And, again when famine revisited the state in 1965 - 67, Oxfam was there to extend its services. Since then, it has expanded and evolved a strong partnership with the local NGOs in different parts of India, to develop programmes for the poorest. One of its five key programmes, ‘Right to Sustainable Livelihoods’, focuses on natural asset development. Oxfam also has projects for developing knowledge base, and spreading awareness.

For details:
Oxfam (India) Trust,
C - 5, Qutab Institutional Area,
New Delhi 110016
Tel: 26516481 - 7



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Pressures on Freshwater Eco-system

The United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) has been at the forefront of assessing global water resources while suggesting a sustainable usage pattern. Recently, it has released Vital Water Graphics (www.unep.org/vitalwater) — a total of 40 graphics on fresh and marine waters. ‘Water for People, Water for Life’, the United Nation’s World Water Development Report is another valuable and timely addition. The following table, a part of this report (pp 14) highlights a wide range of human uses of freshwater and its potential impact on altering the integrity of the ecosystem.

HUMAN ACTIVITY POTENTIAL IMPACT FUNCTIONS AT RISK
Population and  consumption growth Increases water abstraction and acquisition of cultivated land through wetland drainage, and other activities Virtually all ecosystem functions
Infrastructure development fisheries Loss of integrity alters timing and quantity of river flows, water temperatures, nutrients and sediment transport and thus delta replenishment,blocks fish migrations Water quantity, quality, habitats floodplain, fertility,
Land conversion Eliminates key components of aquatic environment, inhibits natural recharge, fills waterbodies with silt Natural flood control, waterfowl and recreation
Overexploitation Depletes living resources and ecosystem functions Food production, water quantity and quality
Introduction of exotic species Alters production, nutrient cycling and loss of  biodiversity among native species Food production, wildlife
Release of pollutants to land, air or water and rainfall patterns Pollution of waterbodies alters chemistry and ecology of rivers, lakes and wetlands; greenhouse gas emissions  hydropower, transport Water supply, habitat; climate change impact on produce dramatic changes in runoff and

Copyright 2003 Centre for Science and Environment