A NEW BEGINNING

 






By the people
  

IN FOCUS

Open letter to the
Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee

Khandwa,Catching every droplet
The lost pond
 

CAMPAIGN

From the courtroom
Face to face
Destroy, then revive

INITIATIVE

Woman power
Paying up
A tiny oasis in Uttar Pradesh
Smile!
CII’s water meet
Rotary’s initiative
Brick by brick
Nurturing the future
CSE’s pilgrims in Madhya Pradesh
Taking initiative
Experiments with water

NEWS FROM GUJARAT

Pure rain
In a great hurry!

JAL BIRADARI

As priceless as amrit
Reviving pynes

JAL YODHA

D V Subramanaian
Ashutosh Agnihotri


NEWS FROM CHENNAI

Rain centre inaugurated
The Alacrity cycle
Porous roads
Plumbers’ meet
Women’s meet


CSE' LATEST DESIGNS

Making a mark in Laburnam

TECHNOLOGY

Pollutants to bind roads
Make your own rain gauge
Smart farming tool
Techno tit bits


CLASSROOM

WATER WISDOM

FUNDING AGENCY

NEWS FROM ABROAD

WATER IN NEWS

AN OPPORTUNITY

READERS SPACE

BOOK/DOCUMENTS

VISUAL WATCH

WEB INFO

EVENT

NOTICE BOARD

    
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Vol. 4   

No. 4

August-September  2002

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Porous roads

To tackle the problem of fast depleting groundwater tables, Indian Concrete Institute, Chennai, has suggested that cement roads can be designed to allow water percolation. Such roads are made up of three layers. Each layer is 80 mm thick, below which is a 200 mm thick pavement slab and at the bottom lies a 350 mm cement stabilised soil.

Is it a viable strategy? We asked this question to DSrinivasan, secretary-general of ICI.

Q: Is this technique costly?
A: No. Only the composition of materials used for constructing the ordinary roads, needs to be altered.

Q: What is the permeability rate?
A: Varies with rainfall and soil type.

Q: Many areas in Chennai have clay soil. Will this technique work in these areas as well?
A: One cannot even build ordinary roads on clay soil.

Although, this experiment has been successful in Japan, in India it is still at an experimental stage.

Plumbers’ meet

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On August 4, about 15 plumbers participated in a meeting organised by the Tamil Nadu unit of National Water Harvester’s Network, CSE and Akash Ganga Trust, a Chennai-based non-governmental organisation.

While welcoming the participants , CSE staffer explained the objective of this meet and the role of the rain centre in providing information. Only one participant had practical experience of rainwater harvesting. The three hours of interactive session cleared many of their doubts. The group came out with interesting suggestions like, using stoneware pipes for interconnection to reduce the cost. This meet was another step in strengthening rainwater harvesting, at the local level.


Women’s meet

On August 31, the Tamil Nadu (TN) unit of National Water Harvester’s Network, CSE along with the Inner Wheel Club of Rotary, Chennai, organised a women’s meet on rainwater harvesting (RWH). It was attended by over 323 representing different districts of Tamil Nadu.


Copyright 2002 Centre for Science and Environment
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