A NEW BEGINNING

 






A rich harvest

IN FOCUS

On the right track?
Groundwater or poison?
Punjab, ready for desi solutions
Saga of tanks


CAMPAIGN

Ways to destroy
Squatters or owners?
VIPs strangling Dal
Restoring Bis Hazari
Lakes in News

WATER LITERACY

For water security
The facilitator
Let us try this out?
Water carnival


INITIATIVE

Sabdoo, surging ahead
Pioneering work
Reasserting rights
Haryana documents
Mission possible


FACE TO FACE


JAL BIRADARI

Common sense, makes sense
Unflinching faith


NEWS FROM GUJARAT

Jal bachao yatra
Checking salt ingress
Water accounting


NEWS FROM CHENNAI

Legally armed
Cultivating temple tanks
Syndicate residency’s endeavour Optimising benefits


JAL YODHAS

P K Senapati
Surinder Bansal
Shree Padree
Anil Rana
M N Mitra


CSE'S LATEST DESIGNS

TECHNOLOGY

Fog collectors
Techno tit bits


FUNDING AGENCY

CLASSROOM

WATER WISDOM

NEWS FROM ABROAD

South Africa: Water apartheid
Kenya:
Drought busting
Japan: Water wizards
Turks & Caicos Islands:
A unique system
Nepal: Spouts return

WATER IN NEWS

REDERS SPACE

CSE'S LAKENET

BOOK/DOCUMENTS

VISUAL WATCH

WEB INFO

NOTICE BOARD

GLIMPSES FROM DTE

EVENT


   
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Vol. 4     

No. 6 

December 2002-January 2003


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Glimpses of books
Glimpses of booksThe Gardens of their Dreams:
Desertification and Culture in World History

Brian Griffith

Zed Books Ltd, UK, 2001, pp 368

This book paints a detailed picture of our ancestors’ experiences in destroying and healing the ecology. Brian Griffith explores the complex socio-cultural aspects of desertification while weaving in fascinating information from different regions.

The 15 chapters of this volume revolve around three basic issues viz,

1. how the expanding wastelands have shaped people’s images of nature, women, politics and religion;

2. how waves of refugees from the arid lands, including the historic migrations of Aryans, Huns and Mongols, have influenced local communities in the green border lands from China to Europe; and,

3. how locals have responded to threats of invasion and environ-mental poverty.

The connection between violence and domination on the one hand, and environmental degradation and desertification on the other is highlighted. Women’s place in the desert is an interesting chapter. It shows how they fight for the rights as the environment becomes unproductive. The book ends with two stories of hope. The first focuses on nature’s power of self renewal in southwest America. While the other takes us to Kenya, showing traditional farmers as a force that can transform.

The book inspires hope. Turning people back towards the path of regaining the lost gardens of their dreams. Griffith stories have a direct implication for our times and the choices we must make for a better future. Worth reading.



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Explore....www.unesco.org/water/iyfw2

This is a special website recently launched by UNESCO to celebrate the International Year of Freshwater, 2003. It provides a platform for individuals, institutions and countries the world over to share ideas, initiatives and events. A vast array of facts on water use, health, droughts, floods and ecosystems can be easily accessed in French and Spanish as well. Surf it to keep a track of any major happenings in the water world this year. Water talk section allows you to be creatively express water through poems, pictures etc. So, as the site says, ‘Jump in! Get your feet wet! Make a splash!’ Let’s make a difference.

 



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Plumbing the Rights

This 30 minutes documentary is a part of Changing Currents, a series exploring water, globally. It is produced by TVE and screened by BBCWorld as a run up to the Third World Water Forum, 2003. These films are also available with CSE.
(Ashwini at ashwini@cseindia.org)

Extensively shot in India and South Africa, ‘Plumbing the Rights’, portrays the struggles of a common person for a share of water to breathe. This tussle against the state is becoming deaf and violent everyday. The film skillfully captures the complexities of the problems and the solutions devised by the people of Gujarat and Rajasthan, India and the Chatsworth Township of Durban. In Durban, people are forced to steal water, inspite of the new water act ensuring 6,000 litres of free daily supply. Watch it.


Copyright 2003 Centre for Science and Environment
webadmin@cseindia.org