A NEW BEGINNING

 






A rich harvest

IN FOCUS

On the right track?
Groundwater or poison?
Punjab, ready for desi solutions
Saga of tanks


CAMPAIGN

Ways to destroy
Squatters or owners?
VIPs strangling Dal
Restoring Bis Hazari
Lakes in News

WATER LITERACY

For water security
The facilitator
Let us try this out?
Water carnival


INITIATIVE

Sabdoo, surging ahead
Pioneering work
Reasserting rights
Haryana documents
Mission possible


FACE TO FACE


JAL BIRADARI

Common sense, makes sense
Unflinching faith


NEWS FROM GUJARAT

Jal bachao yatra
Checking salt ingress
Water accounting


NEWS FROM CHENNAI

Legally armed
Cultivating temple tanks
Syndicate residency’s endeavour Optimising benefits


JAL YODHAS

P K Senapati
Surinder Bansal
Shree Padree
Anil Rana
M N Mitra


CSE'S LATEST DESIGNS

TECHNOLOGY

Fog collectors
Techno tit bits


FUNDING AGENCY

CLASSROOM

WATER WISDOM

NEWS FROM ABROAD

South Africa: Water apartheid
Kenya:
Drought busting
Japan: Water wizards
Turks & Caicos Islands:
A unique system
Nepal: Spouts return

WATER IN NEWS

REDERS SPACE

CSE'S LAKENET

BOOK/DOCUMENTS

VISUAL WATCH

WEB INFO

NOTICE BOARD

GLIMPSES FROM DTE

EVENT


   
subscribe2.gif
archives2.gif
feedback.gif
comments1.gif
home.gif
 

 

catch.jpg (17001 bytes)

Vol. 4   

No. 6

December 2002-January 2003

funding.jpg (7700 bytes)

Novelty encouraged

Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), is increasingly funding non-governmental organisations in India with novel ideas. "Although bilateral funding gets priority. However, upto ten per cent of the funds are kept aside for multilateral projects", said Vijay Kumar, program officer, DANIDA, New Delhi.

"There are no written guidelines for such minor projects. Per project funding vary between Rs 15 lakhs to 1 crore for a period of four years", said Kumar. However, every proposal has to undergo a screening process. Innovative and community-based developmental ideas get priority. Rajiv Gandhi Foundation got support for creating the ‘core of water warriors’ in drought hit state of Rajasthan. This is just one leaf from DANIDA funding book. The application procedures are rather simple. Interested organisations can send in the concept paper. If approved, DANIDA itself will help in developing it.

For details:
Royal Danish Embassy,
11, Aurangzeb Road,
New Delhi 110011; Tel: 23010004




water_wisdom.gif (4755 bytes)

Indian scenario

Water in its natural state is not a threat but a life saviour. But in the developing countries, millions and millions of people continue to suffer from water borne diseases, like cholera, polio,dysentery, typhoid, hepatitis and leptospirosis to name only a few.

Such epidemics have been virtually eliminated from the developed world since the 1920s. The extensive use of filtration and chlorination facilitated this change. During the second world war, the process of desalination developed. The standards of the quality of drinking water were legally defined in these countries, strengthening their safety networks. In countries like India, although the provision of safe drinking water has improved but sanitation has not received much attention, leading to the poor state of affairs. Let us focus on India.

First digest this.

  • About 60 per cent of urban deaths in India are due to lack of safe drinking water facilities. Further deaths due to water borne diseases are second only to malnutrition;
  • Sewage and not the industrial pollution accounts for more than 75 per cent of the surface water contamination in India. Due to negligence, groundwater is also increasingly getting contaminated;

In India, epidemics are common. The presence of laws like Water Prevention and Control of Pollution Act, 1974 or new cures and programs like National Cholera Control and Polio Immunization has not made any significant difference. The lower income group continue to be the worst affected. This situation is not going to change for better - if the state continues to overlook the root cause of the problem ie, accessibility to clean water and sanitation.

Provision of safe drinking water is a political and social problem rather than a technical one. In the developing world, it is intimately connected to the issue of poverty, underdevelopment, and depleting ecology.

 


Copyright 2003 Centre for Science and Environment
webadmin@cseindia.org